Redesigned Antibiotic for Antibiotic-Resistent Bacteria

  • Author: ChemistryViews
  • Published: 26 August 2011
  • Copyright: WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
  • Source / Publisher: Journal of the American Chemical Society/ACS
thumbnail image: Redesigned Antibiotic for Antibiotic-Resistent Bacteria

Vancomycin is an antibiotic used only, after treatment with other antibiotics has failed. Vancomycin-resistant bacteria remodel their cell wall precursor peptidoglycan terminus from D-Ala-D-Ala to D-Ala-D-Lac. Chemically, they replace an amide with an ester, reducing the binding of vancomycin to its target 1000-fold and accounting for the loss in antimicrobial activity.


A team of scientists around Dale L. Boger, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA, have successfully reengineered vancomycin to kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria. A complementary single atom exchange in the vancomycin core structure (O→NH) to counter the single atom exchange in the cell wall precursors of resistant bacteria (NH→O), reinstates potent antimicrobial activity. Remarkably, the redesigned antibiotic binds to the mutant as well as to the wild type peptidoglycan.

This charts a rational path forward for the development of antibiotics for the treatment of vancomycin-resistant bacterial infections. Reengineered organisms to produce the material or semi-synthetic approaches to the analogue are investigated.



Article Views: 1934

Sign in Area

Please sign in below

Additional Sign In options

Please note that to comment on an article you must be registered and logged in.
Registration is for free, you may already be registered to receive, e.g., the newsletter. When you register on this website, please ensure you view our terms and conditions. All comments are subject to moderation.

Article Comments - To add a comment please sign in

Bookmark and Share

If you would like to reuse any content, in print or online, from ChemistryViews.org, please contact us first for permission. more


CONNECT:

ChemistryViews.org on Facebook

ChemistryViews.org on Twitter ChemistryViews.org on YouTube ChemistryViews.org on LinkedIn Sign up for our free newsletter


A product of ChemPubSoc Europe (16 European Chemical Societies)and Wiley-VCH