A Drug Against Obesity?

  • Author: Melania Tesio
  • Published: 18 December 2013
  • Copyright: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
  • Source / Publisher: Nature/Nature Publishing
thumbnail image: A Drug Against Obesity?

Obesity causes insulin resistance, a condition where the body does not respond to the physiological action of insulin. As this metabolic hormone promotes the absorption of glucose from the circulation, obese patients accumulate glucose in their blood, ultimately developing diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.


Miki Okada-Iwabu, University of Tokyo, Japan, and colleagues discovered a molecule that might improve the health of these individuals. The researchers identified AdipoRon (pictured), an orally active synthetic molecule that activates the receptors for adiponectin. This protein promotes fatty-acid oxidation, thereby sensitizing cells to insulin´s action. As a consequence, when the researchers stimulated adiponectin activity with AdipoRon, they increased insulin sensitivity in mice fed with a high fat diet and lowered glucose levels in diabetic mice, thereby increasing their life span.


The use of AdipoRon is thus a promising strategy to treat obesity-related disorders, such as diabetes and insulin resistance.


Article Views: 2317

Sign in Area

Please sign in below

Additional Sign In options

Please note that to comment on an article you must be registered and logged in.
Registration is for free, you may already be registered to receive, e.g., the newsletter. When you register on this website, please ensure you view our terms and conditions. All comments are subject to moderation.

Article Comments - To add a comment please sign in

Bookmark and Share

If you would like to reuse any content, in print or online, from ChemistryViews.org, please contact us first for permission. more


CONNECT:

ChemistryViews.org on Facebook

ChemistryViews.org on Twitter ChemistryViews.org on YouTube ChemistryViews.org on LinkedIn Sign up for our free newsletter


A product of ChemPubSoc Europe (16 European Chemical Societies)and Wiley-VCH