UK's Marine Energy Plans

  • Author: ChemistryViews.org (Picture: Minesto)
  • Published: 11 July 2014
  • Copyright: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA
  • Source / Publisher: The Crown Estate and Minesto
thumbnail image: UK's Marine Energy Plans

The Crown Estate, manager of the UK seabed granting rights to organizations to operate on the seabed, finalized a leasing round, which saw rights awarded for six new wave and tidal current demonstration zones and five new tidal stream sites across the UK. Each of these sites will have the potential to deliver between 10 and 30 MW capacity.
The UK is already a world leader in wave and tidal stream energy. Wales is seen as one of the most suitable places in the world for low velocity tidal energy.


Locations for the demonstration zones and project sites:

Organisation

Location

Zone type/project name

Wave Hub

North Cornwall

Wave demonstration zone

 

North Devon

Tidal stream demonstration zone

 

South Pembrokeshire

Wave demonstration zone

Siemens MCT

Dorset

Portland Bill, tidal stream project site

 

Northern Ireland 

Strangford Lough, tidal stream project site

 

Scotland

Mull of Galloway, tidal stream project site

EMEC

Scotland 

Isle of Harris, wave demonstration zone

 

Scotland

Islay, tidal stream demonstration zone

 

Scotland

Stronsay Firth, tidal stream managed test facility project

Menter Môn

 Wales

West Anglesey, tidal stream demonstration zone 

Minesto

 Wales

Holyhead Deep, tidal stream project site



Minesto, for example, plans to start the installation of a 10 MW marine energy array in 2016. It will now further develop the project, which includes in depth environmental studies, detailed seabed mapping, cable routing, and commercial activities. The Holyhead Deep site is located approx. 7 km from the shore where the water depth is 80–90 m. The tidal currents are 1.5–2.5m/s. The area has been carefully selected to maintain separation from shipping lanes and to minimize the impact on other sea users.
Minesto says its tidal power plant, called Deep Green (pictured), is currently the only known marine power plant to generate electricity from low velocity tidal currents.




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