Summer Reading 2015

  • ChemPubSoc Europe Logo
  • Author: ChemViews
  • Published Date: 22 July 2015
  • Copyright: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
thumbnail image: Summer Reading 2015

Related Articles

Summer is the perfect time to take a break from research papers, textbooks, and paperwork and catch up on some leisure reading. ChemViews Magazine has again collected entertaining books related to chemistry and science for your summer break, recommended by Editors.


You can add your own recommendations in the comments section below.

 

What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions

What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions
by Randall Munroe

Hilarious and informative answers to important questions you probably never thought to ask, such as "What would happen if you tried to hit a baseball pitched at 90 % of the speed of light?"

(suggested by Theresa Kueckmann, Chemistry – An Asian Journal and Brian Johnson, The Chemical Record)

 

Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood

Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood
by Oliver Sacks

In this memoir, neurologist Oliver Sacks chronicles his love affair with science and the odd and sometimes harrowing childhood in which that love affair unfolded.

(suggested by Stephen Horner, Angewandte Chemie)

 

A Short History of Nearly Everything

A Short History of Nearly Everything
by Bill Bryson

Just as the title promises, this broad overview covers nearly everything – from the size of the universe to subatomic particles, from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization – in a thoroughly comprehensible and entertaining way.

(suggested by Meghan Campbell, ChemBioChem)

 

The Matter Factory: A History of the Chemistry Laboratory

The Matter Factory: A History of the Chemistry Laboratory
by Peter J. T. Morris

This book offers a unique way to look at the history of chemistry itself, showing how the development of the laboratory helped shape modern chemistry.

(suggested by Vera Köster, ChemistryViews.org)

 

The Universe in a Nutshell

The Universe in a Nutshell
by Stephen Hawking

This book explains the history and principles of modern physics – including quantum mechanics, general relativity, superstrings, and black holes – to a general audience.

(suggested by Cordula Buse, ChemBioEng Reviews)

 

Scientific Babel: The Language of Science from the Fall of Latin to the Rise of English

Scientific Babel: The Language of Science from the Fall of Latin to the Rise of English
by Michael Gordin

In a sweeping history from the Middle Ages through to today, this book untangles the web of politics, money, personality, and international conflict that led to the English language dominating the world of science.

(suggested by Peter Gölitz, Angewandte Chemie)

 

Life's Greatest Secret: The Story of the Race to Crack the Genetic Code

Life's Greatest Secret: The Story of the Race to Crack the Genetic Code
by Matthew Cobb

This book is the story of the discovery and cracking of the genetic code. It describes cooperation and competition among some of the 20th century's most outstanding and eccentric minds, and moves between biology, physics and chemistry.

(suggested by Richard Threlfall, Asian Journal of Organic Chemistry)

 

The Science of Discworld

The Science of Discworld
by Terry Pratchett

A creative and very entertaining mash-up of fiction and fact, this book alternates between fantastical stories from "Discworld" and explanations of scientific principles such as the Big Bang theory and the evolution of life on earth.

(suggested by Catharina Goedecke, ChemistryViews.org)

 

Note-by-Note Cooking: The Future of Food

Note-by-Note Cooking: The Future of Food
by Hervé This

This book aims to liberate cooks from the constraints of traditional ingredients through the use of pure molecular compounds. It clearly explains the properties of naturally occurring and synthesized compounds and dispels a host of misconceptions about the place of chemistry in cooking.

(suggested by Eva Wille, Executive Director Chemistry, Wiley-VCH)

 

Cantor's Dilemma

Cantor's Dilemma
by Carl Djerassi

Carl Djerassi, the "father of the pill", draws from his career as a scientist to describe the fierce competition driving scientific discovery and the issues in research ethics it can cause.

(suggested by Natalia Ortúzar, ChemMedChem)

 


Also of Interest

 

  • Please add your own book recommendations in the comments section below

 

Article Views: 6955

Sign in Area

Please sign in below

Additional Sign In options

Please note that to comment on an article you must be registered and logged in.
Registration is for free, you may already be registered to receive, e.g., the newsletter. When you register on this website, please ensure you view our terms and conditions. All comments are subject to moderation.

Article Comments - To add a comment please sign in

Bookmark and Share

If you would like to reuse any content, in print or online, from ChemistryViews.org, please contact us first for permission. more


CONNECT:

ChemistryViews.org on Facebook

ChemistryViews.org on Twitter ChemistryViews.org on YouTube ChemistryViews.org on LinkedIn Sign up for our free newsletter


A product of ChemPubSoc Europe (16 European Chemical Societies)and Wiley-VCH