Linear Fe3 Single-Molecule Magnet

  • Author: ChemistryViews.org
  • Published: 24 October 2018
  • Copyright: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA
  • Source / Publisher: Dalton Transactions/Royal Society of Chemistry
  • Associated Societies: Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), UK
thumbnail image: Linear Fe<sub>3</sub> Single-Molecule Magnet

Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are metal-organic complexes which can retain a magnetization after the magnetic field which was used to induce it is turned off. Below the so-called blocking temperature, the relaxation of the magnetization in such systems becomes slow and the total spin remains stable for a time. Polynuclear Fe(II) SMMs are difficult to synthesize and, thus, rare.


Yuan-Zhu Zhang and colleagues, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China, have synthesized a linear trinuclear Fe(II) single-molecule magnet. The team reacted FeCl2·4H2O with the ligand 2-[(pyridine-2-ylimine)-methyl]phenol (Hpymp) in methanol under an argon atmosphere and added NaBPh4. They obtained crystals of the complex [FeII3(pymp)4(MeOH)2][BPh4]2·2MeOH (pictured).


The complex was characterized using X-ray diffraction, which showed a linear Fe3-chain connected by four [pymp] ligands. Magnetic measurements provided evidence for a ferromagnetic coupling within the Fe3-chain, for a magnetic anisotropy in the molecule, and for the single-molecule-magnet character of the complex.


 

Article Views: 926

Sign in Area

Please sign in below

Additional Sign In options

Please note that to comment on an article you must be registered and logged in.
Registration is for free, you may already be registered to receive, e.g., the newsletter. When you register on this website, please ensure you view our terms and conditions. All comments are subject to moderation.

Article Comments - To add a comment please sign in

Bookmark and Share

If you would like to reuse any content, in print or online, from ChemistryViews.org, please contact us first for permission. more


CONNECT:

ChemistryViews.org on Facebook

ChemistryViews.org on Twitter ChemistryViews.org on YouTube ChemistryViews.org on LinkedIn Sign up for our free newsletter


A product of ChemPubSoc Europe (16 European Chemical Societies)and Wiley-VCH