Giant Waste-to-Energy Power Plant

  • Author: ChemistryViews.org
  • Published: 14 February 2016
  • Copyright: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
  • Source / Publisher: Dezeen
thumbnail image: Giant Waste-to-Energy Power Plant

Two Danish architecture firms, Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects and Gottlieb Paludan Architects, have won a competition to design the world’s largest waste-to-energy power plant. The Shenzhen East Waste-to-Energy Plant is supposed to begin operation by 2020 in Shenzhen, China.


The plant is expected to burn 5,000 tons of garbage per day. This is about a third of the waste generated each year by Shenzhen’s 20 million inhabitants.

The plant is designed as a large circular building. Two thirds of its 66,000 m² roof will be covered with photovoltaic panels to generate the plant’s own sustainable energy supply. The building will be surrounded by a landscaped park and will offer a series of visitor facilities, including a looping walkway to the rooftop.


 

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1 Comments

Muhammad Kismurtono wrote:

Waste to Energy as a system for burning garbage

That is very good, but I think that first it must be clear what the emissions of CO2, CH4 are. The environment must be considered for this project.

Fri Feb 19 07:05:11 UTC 2016

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