The Chemistry of Pools

  • ChemPubSoc Europe Logo
  • DOI: 10.1002/chemv.201600058
  • Author: Ricardo Nowack & ChemViews
  • Published Date: 05 July 2016
  • Copyright: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
thumbnail image: The Chemistry of Pools

Summer is in full swing in many parts of the world, and what could be more refreshing than a swimming pool on a hot day? However, both swimmers and the environment can contaminate the pool, for example with algae spores, bacteria, viruses, fungi, or bodily fluids. Chlorinating agents are commonly used to keep the pool clean and sanitary. But how do they work? Find out below.

 


Chlorinating a Pool

Chlorinating a Pool

Another chlorinating agent is trichloroisocyanuric acid.
Trichloroisocyanuric acid in the schwimming pool water
In comparison to the inorganic salts described above, it gradually releases HClO and contains no Ca which increases the water hardness and can lead to mineral deposits. However, cyanuric acid concentration in the pool will build up, requiring dilution by draining and refilling the pool.

 

pH of Pool Water

pH of Pool Water


Function of Chlorination

Function of Chlorination



Smell of a Pool

Smell of a Pool



Effect of Sunlight on Chlorination

HClO is unstable in sunlight. Cl is ineffective for disinfection. Isocyanuric acid is added to stabilize the chlorine levels. It reacts in water with HClO to dichloroisocyanuric acid, which acts as a reservoir for HOCl.

Effect of Sunlight on Chlorination


Sources


Also of Interest

 

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