US Should Remain in Paris Climate Agreement

  • Author: ChemistryViews.org
  • Published: 28 April 2017
  • Copyright: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA
  • Source / Publisher: Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES), USA
thumbnail image: US Should Remain in Paris Climate Agreement

Major companies across the U.S. – including Apple, BHP Billiton, BP, DuPont, General Mills, Google, Intel, Microsoft, National Grid, Novartis Corp., PG&E, Rio Tinto, Schneider Electric, Shell, Unilever, and Walmart – have urged President Trump to keep the United States in the Paris Agreement on climate change. The group, organized by the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES), says in a letter to the president that it this will help them manage climate risks and stay competitive in the global clean energy market.

The Paris Climate Agreement, finalized in December 2015, has been ratified by 143 countries, including the United States. The White House has said a decision on whether to stay in the agreement is due before the president attends the G7 Summit in Italy in late May. Considered a treaty under international law, the Paris Climate Agreement holds the United States to a 26–28 % reduction in greenhouse gases by 2025, based on the levels in 2005.

In the letter, the companies emphasize that U.S. participation in the Paris Agreement helps them compete and plan future investments by ensuring a more balanced global climate effort, setting long-term objectives, improving transparency, and encouraging market-based approaches to minimize costs. In addition, they note that strengthening global action over time will reduce future climate impacts that damage or disrupt business facilities and operations, supply chains, agricultural productivity, and water supplies.

“Business leaders recognize the costly impacts of climate change, and the opportunities for jobs and growth in a clean technology future”, said the C2ES President Bob Perciasepe.


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