The Chemistry of Deodorants

The Chemistry of Deodorants

Author: ChemViews Magazine, Solveig Hock

The ancient Egyptians already used aluminum crystals as antiperspirants. The ancient Romans used a mixture of charcoal and goat fat as deodorant. In the 19th century, lime solutions or potassium permanganate were used. These substances work disinfecting. The first commercial deodorant was patented by Edna Murphey in Philadelphia, PA, USA, in 1888. Today, they are an everyday part of life. So let us look at how they work from a chemical perspective.

Where Does Body Odor Come From?

Chemistry of Deodorants: Where Does Body Odor Come From?

What is the Difference Between Deodorants and Antiperspirants? How Do Deodorants Work?

What is the Difference Between Deodorants and Antiperspirants? How Do Deodorants Work?

There are also “mixed” products with both antibacterial and antiperspirant properties.

How Do Antiperspirants Work?

Aluminum or zirconium compounds, such as aluminum chlorohydrate, react with water in the glands to form gel-like plugs of aluminium hydroxide that block the sweat glands:

How Do Antiperspirants Work?

Which Ingredients Do Deodorants and Antiperspirants Contain?

Chemistry of Deodorants Ingredients

Types of Deodorants and Antiperspirants

Chemistry of Deodorants: Types of Deodorant and Antiperspirant

Some Health and Environmental Risks

Health and Environmental Risks


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